Caregiver Program

(This official Q&A from IRCC is being shared with our viewers and friends as a public service so that they may avoid any fraudulent recruitment schemes and scams on job offer for Caregivers).

What are the improvements to the Caregiver Program?

Starting November 30, 2014, the Caregiver Program will include two new pathways for permanent residence for foreign workers with experience as caregivers in Canada.

The two new pathways are:

For both the Caring for Children Pathway and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway:

In addition, the Live-in Caregiver Program pathway to permanent residence is still open for all live-in caregivers who:


What sort of work permit should I apply for if this is my first time as a caregiver in Canada and my employer applies for a Labour Market Impact Assessment after November 30, 2014?

You will need to apply for a regular work permit, not a specific caregiver work permit.

You can live in your own home. If you and your employer have agreed that you will live in their home, this should be:


I am already working as a live-in caregiver. Will I be able to apply for permanent residence when I complete the work requirement?

Yes. You may continue working as a live-in caregiver and apply for permanent residence when you meet the work requirement. You do not need to switch to one of the new pathways.

If you choose to remain in the Live-in Caregiver Program pathway, your eligibility for permanent residence will still be based on the requirements of that program. This includes the requirement to live in the home of your employer.

If you choose to apply to the Caring for Children Pathway or the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway, your eligibility for permanent residence will be based on the requirements of those pathways.


I just applied for a work permit as a live-in caregiver. Will I be able to apply for permanent residence when I complete the work requirement?

Yes. You may come to Canada to work as a live-in caregiver and apply for permanent residence based on the requirements of the Live-in Caregiver Program. This includes the requirement to live in the home of your employer.

If you choose to apply to the Caring for Children Pathway or the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway, your eligibility for permanent residence will be based on the requirements of those pathways.


I am working as a live-in caregiver but would like to move into my own home. Can I?

To work as a caregiver on a live-out basis, your employer will need a new Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) and you will need to apply for a new work permit based on that LMIA. In addition, you would have to apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway, and not through the Live-in Caregiver Program.


I have heard that there is now a cap on the number of applications CIC will process for caregivers. What is the cap?

CIC will process 2,750 applications from principal applicants each year for both the Caring for Children and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathways, for a total of 5,500. That does not include spouses and dependants. This number is in line with the number of caregivers who have been applying for permanent residence each year, an average of 4,500 per year since 2011.

If you originally applied under the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP), were issued a work permit under that program and continue to work in Canada with an LCP work permit, you will be able to apply for permanent residence under the LCP. There is no cap on the number of applicants who can apply to the pathway for the Live-in Caregiver Program.


I have submitted an application for permanent residence through the Live-in Caregiver Program. Can I submit an application to either the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway as well?

If you meet the requirements of either the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathways, you may submit another application for permanent residence, including providing the required information and processing fee.


Can I still hire a caregiver on a live-in basis?

If you want to hire a caregiver on a live-in basis, you may hire other Canadians or permanent residents, or you may make an arrangement with a foreign worker after getting a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment that confirms that no Canadians or permanent residents are available. See the caregiver page of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.


I applied for a Labour Market Impact Assessment after November 30, 2014, and am hiring a caregiver who has agreed to a live-in arrangement. Can I charge for room and board?

In most cases, no. See the Housing section of the caregiver page of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.

If you are hiring a caregiver on a live-in basis who has already been working in Canada under the Live-in Caregiver Program, you may charge for room and board. The deductions for room and board must be included in the employment contract that you and the caregiver sign as part of the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). For help, you may contact Service Canada’s Centre of Specialization for in-home caregiver LMIA applications.


I applied for a Labour Market Impact Assessment before November 30, 2014, and am hiring a caregiver through the Live-in Caregiver Program. Can I still charge for room and board?

Yes. If you employ a foreign caregiver through the Live-in Caregiver Program, you may charge for room and board. The deductions for room and board must be included in the employment contract that you and the caregiver sign as part of the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). For help, you may contact Service Canada’s Centre of Specialization for in-home caregiver LMIA applications.


Do I have to pay the full Labour Market Impact Assessment fee when I apply for permission to hire a foreign caregiver?

Yes. See the Processing Fee section of the caregiver page of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.


Will I be able to hire a foreign caregiver if my region has an unemployment rate above six per cent?

In general, reforms to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program will apply to foreign caregivers and their employers. However, the policy of refusing to process work applications in areas of high unemployment does not apply to the hiring of foreign caregivers. It applies only to specific low-skilled, low-wage occupations in the food and beverage service, accommodation and retail sectors. See the ‘Information for Employers’ section of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.


Do I need to provide proof that I have the ability to pay the salary of a caregiver as part of the Labour Market Impact Assessment application when I look to hire a foreign caregiver?

Yes. See the Financial Ability section of the caregiver page of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.


I am hiring a caregiver with a regular work permit and not a Live-in Caregiver Program work permit. Do I have to pay for the caregiver’s transportation costs to get to the work location?

Employers of caregivers in a National Occupational Classification (NOC) C occupation, such as a home child care provider, a nurse aide, an orderly, a patient service associate or a home support worker, must always pay the transportation costs (e.g. plane, train, boat, car, bus) of the caregiver to the work location in Canada.

You are not expected to pay the caregiver’s transportation costs if you are hiring a caregiver in a NOC A occupation, such as a registered nurse or registered psychiatric nurse, or in a NOC B occupation, such as a licensed practical nurse.

See the caregiver page of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.


Do I have to ensure that the caregiver I have hired has proper accommodation in a live-out situation? Will I have to show proof that there are affordable rental options in my area?

When you hire a foreign worker in a National Occupational Classification (NOC) C occupation, such as a home child care provider, a nurse aide, an orderly, a patient service associate or a home support worker, you are expected to show that you are providing affordable housing or that affordable housing is available in your area.

You are not expected to provide affordable housing or show that affordable housing is available in your area as part of the Labour Market Impact Assessment application if you are hiring a caregiver in a NOC A occupation, such as a registered nurse or registered psychiatric nurse, or in a NOC B occupation, such as a licensed practical nurse.

See the Housing section of the caregiver page of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.


I have hired a caregiver on a live-out basis, but he/she has asked to make it a live-in arrangement. Am I responsible for providing accommodation?

A live-in arrangement is possible only if both you and the caregiver agree to that arrangement. If that is the case, a new Labour Market Impact Assessment and work permit reflecting a live-in arrangement would be needed.

See the Housing section of the caregiver page of Employment and Social Development Canada’s website for more information.


What are the improvements to the Caregiver Program?

Starting November 30, 2014, the Caregiver Program will include two new pathways for permanent residence for foreign workers with experience as caregivers in Canada.

The two new pathways are:

For both the Caring for Children Pathway and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway:

In addition, the Live-in Caregiver Program pathway to permanent residence is still open for all live-in caregivers who:


What sort of work permit should I apply for if this is my first time as a caregiver in Canada and my employer applies for a Labour Market Impact Assessment after November 30, 2014?

You will need to apply for a regular work permit, not a specific caregiver work permit.

You can live in your own home. If you and your employer have agreed that you will live in their home, this should be:


I am already working as a live-in caregiver. Will I be able to apply for permanent residence when I complete the work requirement?

Yes. You may continue working as a live-in caregiver and apply for permanent residence when you meet the work requirement. You do not need to switch to one of the new pathways.

If you choose to remain in the Live-in Caregiver Program pathway, your eligibility for permanent residence will still be based on the requirements of that program. This includes the requirement to live in the home of your employer.

If you choose to apply to the Caring for Children Pathway or the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway, your eligibility for permanent residence will be based on the requirements of those pathways.


I just applied for a work permit as a live-in caregiver. Will I be able to apply for permanent residence when I complete the work requirement?

Yes. You may come to Canada to work as a live-in caregiver and apply for permanent residence based on the requirements of the Live-in Caregiver Program. This includes the requirement to live in the home of your employer.

If you choose to apply to the Caring for Children Pathway or the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway, your eligibility for permanent residence will be based on the requirements of those pathways.


I am working as a live-in caregiver but would like to move into my own home. Can I?

To work as a caregiver on a live-out basis, your employer will need a new Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) and you will need to apply for a new work permit based on that LMIA. In addition, you would have to apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway, and not through the Live-in Caregiver Program.


I have heard that there is now a cap on the number of applications CIC will process for caregivers. What is the cap?

CIC will process 2,750 applications from principal applicants each year for both the Caring for Children and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathways, for a total of 5,500. That does not include spouses and dependants. This number is in line with the number of caregivers who have been applying for permanent residence each year, an average of 4,500 per year since 2011.

If you originally applied under the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP), were issued a work permit under that program and continue to work in Canada with an LCP work permit, you will be able to apply for permanent residence under the LCP. There is no cap on the number of applicants who can apply to the pathway for the Live-in Caregiver Program.


I have submitted an application for permanent residence through the Live-in Caregiver Program. Can I submit an application to either the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway as well?

If you meet the requirements of either the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathways, you may submit another application for permanent residence, including providing the required information and processing fee.


Can I continue working towards permanent residence through the Live-in Caregiver Program if I change my employer after November 30, 2014?

Yes. To continue to work towards permanent residence through the Live-in Caregiver Program, you must seek an employer who wishes to hire you on a live-in basis. You must also continue to meet the other requirements of the Live-in Caregiver Program.


I plan to apply for a work permit after November 30, 2014. Does that mean I cannot be part of the Live-in Caregiver Program?

The cut-off date of November 30, 2014, applies only to whether Service Canada has received an employer’s application for a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). If your employer receives a positive decision on an LMIA application that was received by Service Canada on or before November 30, 2014, you will be able to apply for a Live-in Caregiver Program work permit. You will also eventually be able to apply for permanent residence through the Live-in Caregiver Program if and when you have met the requirements to do so.


I left my job as a live-in caregiver and started working for a new employer on a live-out basis. I would now like to return to the Live-in Caregiver Program. Can I?

Yes. If it has been less than four years since your arrival in Canada and you still have enough time to meet the work requirement to apply for permanent residence through the Live-in Caregiver Program, you may apply for a new Live-in Caregiver Program work permit. Your employer must obtain a new Labour Market Impact Assessment and you must obtain a new work permit before you can start working for the employer in a live-in arrangement.


How do I apply as a child care provider for the Caring for Children Pathway?

Starting November 30, 2014, child care providers will have an additional option for applying for permanent residence that is very similar to the Live-in Caregiver Program criteria but without the requirement of living in the home of the employer.

To qualify, you must meet these requirements when you apply for permanent residence:


How do I apply as a health-care provider for the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway?

Starting November 30, 2014, caregivers in a variety of health-care occupations will have an additional option for applying for permanent residence.

To qualify, you must meet these requirements when you apply for permanent residence application:

When you apply for permanent residence for this pathway, you will need to show that you performed the duties described in one of the following National Occupational Classifications for two years in Canada:


Will I meet the language and education requirements of the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathways?

Language ability and education are assessed as part of the work permit application for foreign nationals applying to the Live-in Caregiver Program. With the Caring for Children and Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathways to permanent residence, language ability and education will be assessed as part of the application for permanent residence. Like other economic immigration programs, these assessments will be based on a designated third-party language testand, if necessary, an Educational Credential Assessment from a designated organization.


How long will it take CIC to process applications under the Caring for Children or the Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathways?

Complete applications under the new pathways will be processed within six months.


Can I count the time that I have worked under the Live-in Caregiver Program towards the work requirement of either the Caring for Children Pathway or the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway of the Caregiver Program?

Yes. As long as your work experience meets the specific requirements of the pathway you plan to apply to, your work experience as a live-in caregiver in Canada may be counted towards meeting the work requirement of the Caring for Children Pathway or the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway. You will also need to meet all other requirements to be eligible to apply through one of the pathways.


How long do I have to meet the work requirement of the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway?

You must have two years of full-time work experience in Canada within four years before you apply for permanent residence through one of the pathways.


What work experience must I get to be able to apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway?

To qualify for the Caring for Children Pathway, you must have two years of full-time work experience in Canada, authorized by a work permit, as a home child care provider (National Occupation Classification 4411). You must have cared for children under the age of 18. Foster parents are not eligible to apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children Pathway.

To qualify for the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway, you must have two years of full-time work experience in Canada, authorized by a work permit, in one of the following occupation groups:


Can I use work experience in more than one occupation to be able to apply for permanent residence through the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Pathway?

No. You must have two years of full-time work experience in Canada in a single eligible occupation. For example, you would be eligible to apply if you had two years of experience as a licensed practical nurse or as a registered nurse, but you would not be eligible to apply if you had one year of experience as a licensed practical nurse and one year of experience as a registered nurse.


What documents do I need to prove my work experience when I apply for permanent residence under the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway?

The Caring for Children Document Checklist (PDF, 381.35 KB) and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Document Checklist (PDF, 384.83 KB)identify the forms and documents you must submit with your application for permanent residence through each pathway.


I have been working legally in Canada as a home child care provider, but not with a Live-in Caregiver Program work permit. Can I use that experience to apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children Pathway?

Yes. You will also need to meet all other requirements to be eligible to apply through this pathway.


I have the work experience needed to apply to the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway but the cap on applications has already been reached. What are my options?

If the cap has been reached when you are ready to apply, you may choose to wait until the pathway re-opens or use the Come to Canada tool to see if you may be eligible to apply under another program.

The cap of 2,750 principal applicants for each pathway, or 5,500 each year in all, is intended to meet demand. In recent years, about 4,500 caregivers have applied for permanent residence each year. Spouses, common-law partners and dependent children of principal applicants are not included under the cap.


I had a medical exam when I applied for my work permit. Do I need a new medical exam to apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway?

Yes. You will need to prove that you and your family members have completed a medical exam within one year before you apply for permanent residence through either pathway.


I worked in Canada illegally. Can I use that experience to meet the work requirement of the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway?

No. Any experience you include in your application must have been authorized by a work permit to count towards meeting the work experience requirement for either pathway. If you have ever worked in Canada illegally, your application may be refused.


Can I apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway if I work in Quebec and plan to live there?

No. If you plan to live in Quebec, you must apply to the Government of Québec under one of their programs. Quebec selects its own immigrants.


Can I apply for permanent residence through the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pathway if I have work experience in Quebec but plan to move elsewhere in Canada?

Yes. You can count your work experience in Quebec and apply through one of the pathways if you plan to live in Canada outside Quebec. You will need to satisfy the immigration officer that you intend to live in a province other than Quebec. You may wish to include supporting documentation with your application to help prove that you plan to live elsewhere in Canada.


I want to hire a foreign worker as a live-in caregiver in Canada. What steps do I take?

Before investing time and money, learn about the conditions of the Live-in Caregiver Program. Be sure it is the best way to meet your needs.

You must first try to hire a Canadian citizen or permanent resident in the available job. When you apply to Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) for permission to hire a foreign worker, you will be asked to show what efforts you made in this regard.

If you have been unable to hire a Canadian or permanent resident, your next step is to apply to ESDC for what is known as a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), which confirms that there is no Canadian worker available to do the job. If ESDC issues you a positive LMIA, you are then authorized to hire a foreign worker.

It also tells you which documents you must give your future employee so that he or she can apply for a work permit through a Canadian visa office outside Canada.

You are responsible for finding a foreign live-in caregiver. To do so, you can use advertisements, personal contacts or hiring agencies.

When you have found a foreign live-in caregiver you want to hire, you must first contact Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). If your future employee applies for a work permit and meets the program’s requirements, he or she will receive a work permit. The approval process could take several months. Check the latest information on CIC’s processing times. Your caregiver cannot work for you until CIC approves a work permit showing your name as the employer.


I want to hire a foreign worker as a live-in caregiver in Canada. What steps do I take?

Before investing time and money, learn about the conditions of the Live-in Caregiver Program. Be sure it is the best way to meet your needs.

You must first try to hire a Canadian citizen or permanent resident in the available job. When you apply to Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) for permission to hire a foreign worker, you will be asked to show what efforts you made in this regard.

If you have been unable to hire a Canadian or permanent resident, your next step is to apply to ESDC for what is known as a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), which confirms that there is no Canadian worker available to do the job. If ESDC issues you a positive LMIA, you are then authorized to hire a foreign worker.

It also tells you which documents you must give your future employee so that he or she can apply for a work permit through a Canadian visa office outside Canada.

You are responsible for finding a foreign live-in caregiver. To do so, you can use advertisements, personal contacts or hiring agencies.

When you have found a foreign live-in caregiver you want to hire, you must first contact Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). If your future employee applies for a work permit and meets the program’s requirements, he or she will receive a work permit. The approval process could take several months. Check the latest information on CIC’s processing times. Your caregiver cannot work for you until CIC approves a work permit showing your name as the employer.


What is a recruiter under the Live-in Caregiver Program?

"Recruiters" are people, companies or agencies that want to attract live-in caregivers. They usually act for employers who want to hire workers for existing jobs. Some recruiters seek live-in caregivers before employers ask for them. Recruiters may also hire third parties to provide recruitment services.

Recruiters are not citizenship or immigration consultants. Citizenship or immigration consultants are authorized representatives of foreign nationals. For a fee, citizenship or immigration consultants may represent, advise or consult on citizenship or immigration matters with:

In some cases, a person or company may be both a recruiter and a citizenship or immigration consultant. If so, the two roles, and the related fees, must be separated for the purposes of the Live-in Caregiver Program.


What is a recruitment fee under the Live-in Caregiver Program?

Recruiters charge recruitment fees for recruitment services, such as:


Who pays the live-in caregiver recruitment fees?

Under the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP), the employer who asked for services related to hiring and retaining a live-in caregiver must pay these fees. The fees are paid to the recruiter.

The employer cannot get the money for these fees from the live-in caregiver, through payroll deductions or any other means.

If the recruiter has mistakenly charged the live-in caregiver for a recruitment fee and the live-in caregiver can prove he or she paid such fees, the employer must re-pay the caregiver in full. The employer must pay all fees for recruitment services.


Can the live-in caregiver recruiter charge for other services?

Recruiters may offer workers some services that are not considered recruitment services under the Live-in Caregiver Program. These services are optional for workers. They include:


Who pays the fees for other services that live-in caregiver recruiters provide?

Under the Live-in Caregiver Program, recruiters may charge fees for services that are not recruitment services to workers. In these cases, the person using these services will need to pay.


What is an employment contract for a live-in caregiver?

An employment contract is a written agreement. It outlines the conditions of your employment and helps protect your rights as an employee. If there is a misunderstanding between you and your employer over your job and duties, refer to the contract when you talk to your employer.


How are live-in caregiver employment contracts enforced?

If you cannot resolve a conflict with your employer, contact the government ministry responsible for labour or employment standards in the province or territory where you work. You can use the contract as a basis for registering a complaint against your employer with that office.


What rights do I have as a live-in caregiver under labour or employment laws?

As a live-in caregiver, you have legal rights to fair working conditions and fair treatment under labour laws in most provinces and territories. Nothing in your contract or working conditions can violate these rights.

Your employment contract will help protect your rights as an employee. Find out more about the information that should be in your contract.

You also have the right to leave an unsatisfactory employer. Find out more about extending your stay if you change, lose or quit your job.

Regulation 185 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations lists the conditions that may be put on your work permit.

Working conditions, such as minimum hourly wages, vary widely across Canada. You should find out what the labour laws are where you work by checking with your provincial or territorial labour standards office.

Labour laws may cover rights in areas such as:

Public holidays are days when most workers, including live-in caregivers, can have the day off with pay or receive a premium for working, which could be overtime pay. In Canada, some common holidays are:

Some provinces or territories have one or two other public holidays.

See also Temporary Foreign Workers: Your rights and the law.


As a live-in caregiver, can I get hospital and medical insurance?

Under Canada's health insurance system, Canadian residents do not pay certain hospital and medical expenses. Depending where you work, you may need to wait for a period of time before you are eligible for public health insurance. Your employer must pay for you to be covered by private health insurance until you are eligible for public health insurance. Your employment contract should state that your employer has paid for private health insurance for you.

When you arrive in Canada, contact the medical care or hospital insurance office in the province or territory where you work. That office can tell you when you will be eligible for public health insurance. You can find this information in the government section of the telephone directory or on provincial and territorial government websites.

Contact your provincial or territorial ministry of health for more information.


I am a live-in caregiver. What happens if I lose my job?

If you lose your job, you should find a new employer under the Live-in Caregiver Program as soon as possible. However, you may be eligible for Employment Insurance (EI) benefits while you look for another job. If so, EI will provide you with benefits if you lose your job through no fault of your own. The number of hours you must work before you qualify for EI will depend on the unemployment rate in your region when you file a claim for benefits.

You may also be eligible for EI benefits that are provided at certain times when you are unable to work. This includes sickness, maternity, parental and compassionate care benefits.

While you are working, your employer deducts EI premiums from your wages. The amount deducted depends on how much you earn. Your employer sends your EI premiums to the government.

For more information, contact the Service Canada office nearest you.


My employer is moving within the province. Do I need a new work permit or Labour Market Opinion?

If your employer is moving within the same province or territory, you do not need a new work permit or Labour Market Opinion. However, you should send your new address to Citizenship and Immigration Canada.


My employer is moving to another province or territory. Do I need a new work permit or Labour Market Opinion?

If your employer is moving to a new province or territory, he or she must get a new Labour Market Opinion from Employment and Social Development Canada. Also, you must get a new work permit before you can work in the new location.

Apply for a new work permit well before you move to the new location with your employer. Be sure to apply at least 30 days before your current work permit expires.


Can I keep working as a live-in caregiver if my work permit has expired?

It is illegal to work in Canada without a work permit. However, if you have applied to extend your work permit, you can keep working under the same conditions (such as working for the same employer) until Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) decides on your renewal application and notifies you. This is known as having implied status.

You should apply to extend your work permit at least 30 days before it expires. Consult CIC’s current processing times to find out when you are likely to receive your new work permit.


Can I work for more than one employer at a time under the Live-in Caregiver Program?

No, you cannot work for more than one employer at a time under the Live-in Caregiver Program. Under this program, your work permit specifies your employer and the type of work you may do in Canada.


Can I change employers under the Live-in Caregiver Program?

Yes, you may change employers under the Live-in Caregiver Program. However, you must first sign an employment contract with your new employer so that your new employer may apply for a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). After Employment and Social Development Canada issues a positive LMIA, you must apply for a new work permit.

There are several other steps you must take before you change employers, including asking your current employer for some documents. For more information, see Changing Jobs.


How can I find a new live in caregiver position?

Your local Service Canada office may have information about live-in caregiver jobs. You can search the national Job Bank. You can also try other ways, such as looking in the classified ads section of your local newspaper.


Can I leave the Live-in Caregiver Program and get another type of job?

If you wish to leave the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) and get another type of job, you need to find a job first. Then, your new employer must get a positive Labour Market Opinion (a document that an employer in Canada must usually get before hiring a foreign worker). After that, you must apply for a new work permit. For more information, see Changing Jobs.

The hours you work for any employer outside the LCP will not count toward the work experience you need to apply for permanent residence under the LCP.


As a temporary worker, what can I do if my employer is treating me unfairly?

As a temporary worker, your employment contract should clearly define your:

If you think your employer is treating you unfairly, you can call or write to the nearest provincial or territorial labour standards office for help. Your employer is not allowed to punish you for complaining to a labour standards office.

See also As an immigrant or temporary resident, what can I do if I’m victim of abuse?


How much should I be paid if I work extra hours or during a day off as a live-in caregiver?

You should be paid for overtime according to the employment law in your province or territory.

Employment and Social Development Canada provides information on wage rates. For information on overtime rates, consult your provincial or territorial labour standards office.


As a live-in caregiver, can I refuse to work for personal or religious reasons?

You have the right to refuse duties that are not in your employment contract. The employment contract should clearly define your hours of work and your time off, including holidays and vacations. Before you sign a contract, you and your employer should agree to time-off requirements for personal or religious matters. You have the right to refuse duties that are not in your contract.


Can my family come to Canada with me if I am a live-in caregiver?

Family members do not normally come to Canada with people working under the Live-in Caregiver Program. Even if an employer agrees that a family member can live with you in the home where you will provide care, future employers may not agree to the same terms. Also, you may not make enough money to support your family members in Canada.

However, you may be allowed to bring your family with you if you satisfy a visa officer that:


What is abuse?

Abuse can take many forms. Some forms of abuse are considered criminal acts in Canada. The people who commit them can be punished under the law. These include:

Each of the following forms of abuse is considered a human rights abuse:

See also As a live-in caregiver, what can I do if I feel my employer is treating me unfairly?.


As an immigrant or temporary resident, what can I do if I’m victim of abuse?

Call 1-888-242-2100 to contact the IRCC Client Support Centre for information on your citizenship or immigration status.

In an emergency, call 9-1-1 or your local police.

Call 2-1-1 to find community, social and health services.

See also:


Can my employer deport me?

No, your employer cannot deport you from Canada. If your employer is threatening to do so, you can file a complaint with your provincial or territorial labour standards office. Threats or intimidation are considered forms of abuse in Canada. A caregiver support network or advocacy group can also give you counselling and help.


Can I study in Canada while I am a live-in caregiver?

Yes. However, remember that you are in Canada to work as a full-time live-in caregiver. Also, if your course or program lasts more than six months, you will need a study permit. You can take non-credit special interest courses without a study permit. See the study permit application guide for courses that do not require a study permit.

If you are already working as a caregiver in Canada, you can download and print the study permit application form, or apply online. You must pay a processing fee for your study permit.


As a live-in caregiver, can I work in another country for my Canadian employer?

No. Your live-in caregiver work permit only authorizes you to work in the Canadian home of your employer or of the person you are caring for. You may be able to get permission from another country to work there. However, that work does not count toward your work requirement for permanent residence under the Live-in Caregiver Program.

If you work for your Canadian employer in another country, provincial or territorial labour and employment standards do not apply to you there.


As a live-in caregiver, can I return to my home country for a vacation?

Yes, you can return to your home country for a vacation. The length of your vacation should be written in your employment contract. If you take a longer vacation than that, without written consent from your employer, you could lose your job in Canada.

If you leave Canada before your application for permanent residence is approved, you may not be allowed to come back into Canada, especially if:

In this case, if you cannot return to Canada for any reason, your application may be abandoned.

Before travelling, check with your country’s government for information on visiting or exit visa requirements. They may have changed while you have been working in Canada.

Citizens from some countries and territories must have temporary resident visas to enter Canada. If you are from one of these countries, you may have to get another visa before you can return to Canada. This could take time. Find out the rules before you leave Canada.

If you stay outside Canada for more than one year or if your work permit expires while you are outside Canada, you will have to reapply to return to Canada under the Live-in Caregiver Program.


Can I leave Canada while IRCC processes my application for permanent residence?

Yes. However, if you leave Canada while your application is being processed, you must meet all the admissibility rules before being allowed back into Canada.

If you leave Canada and want to return, you must have all the required documents to enter. This can include:

If you are unable to return to Canada, we could determine that you abandoned your application. In that case, we will not process it.

If a spouse or partner sponsored you under the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada (SCLPC) class while you were living in Canada:

You may want to re-apply to be sponsored from outside Canada as a member of the Family class if:

If you need to re-apply from outside Canada to be sponsored as a member of the Family class, you should:


Can my spouse or common-law partner work in Canada?

Yes, in most cases, your spouse or common-law partner can work in Canada. However, they will usually need a work permit to work in Canada. They must apply for their own work permit.

In some cases, your spouse or common-law partner may be able to apply for an open work permit—allowing him or her to accept any job with any employer. For more information, see Who can apply for an open work permit?

In other cases, your spouse or common-law partner must apply for a work permit for a specific employer. The employer may have to get a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). An LMIA allows an employer to hire someone for a specific job. Find out if your spouse or common-law partner's employer needs an LMIAto hire them.


I want to stay longer in Canada as a live-in caregiver. What documents do I need?

If you want to continue working for the same employer, you will need:

Once you have the necessary documents, you can apply to the Case Processing Centre in Vegreville, Alberta, to extend your work permit.


I am ready t

Get the latest visa & migration news from IVC - FREE!

Become your own migration expert and join successful immigrants overseas!

About the Author

Crispin Aranda

Crispin Aranda

Crispin R. Aranda is an established International Visa Conselor and Immigrant Advocate. He is the president of IVC and is in several migration radio programs.


IVC and IVC staff are proud members or affiliates of

ICCRC logoIBP logoICEF logoPIER logo
MARA logoCANCHAM logoANZCHAM logoBritish Council logo
a