Of the 68,000 net migrants to New Zealand to June this year, the Auckland Chamber of Commerce (ACC) continued, “over a quarter include temporary work visa-holders who originate primarily from the UK, France, Germany and Australia."  Numbered among this list are young people who have been admitted to New Zealand on a Working Holiday Visa. Working holiday visas allow older children and young adults, general from 18 to 30 years old, to travel and work in New Zealand for up to 12 months.  UK Citizens are allowed to remain in New Zealand for up to 23 months.

Auckland's Chamber of Commerce, or ACC, has also expressed dissatisfaction with a “disconnect” between Auckland’s high immigration and skill shortage needs.  According to ACC immediate and long-term shortages for certain skills needed to build more houses, such as construction, are not being met or targetted.

ACC says about a quarter of net migrants are foreign students (Indian and Chinese nationals) who apply for residency after completing their New Zealand qualifications.  However, it was also mentioned that about a quarter of net migrants are foreign students, such as Indian and Chinese nationals, applying for residency after completing their New Zealand qualifications.  According to ACC, none of the new migrants “directly address Auckland’s well documented and persistent skill shortages – long term and immediate shortages in construction, engineering (30,000), health and social services, ICT (1500) and electronics, and areas such as teaching, chefs, trades and heavy truck driving (some 500).”

An article posted on the NewZealandNow.govt.nz website attributes the growth of the country's construction industry to two factos: continued population growth and; ongoing rebuilding efforts in Christchurch and the nearby Canterbury region.  It can be recalled that Christchurch was hit by two earthquakes, 6 months apart in September 2010 and February 2011. These 2 earthquakes resulted in the loss of 185 lives, injuries to thousand and destruction of property. 

The New Zealand government predicts that the strongest growth in the labour market will occur in construction and related activities with Auckland "making most of the pace ... driven by residential in the Auckland region and ... the Canterbury rebuild." **

Tourism and the hospitality sector continues to be big business in New Zealand with overseas tourists numbering more than three million in August last year. Meeting international standards and the needs of these two industries remains as important now than ever.

And of course, let's not forget New Zealand's information and communications technologies sector (ICT).  This is a multi-layered sector covering such diverse industries as health, geospatial and agricultural technology. Schools have in fact, upped their academic offerings in the field.

Recognizing the need for highly competent professionals in the above-mentioned fields, universities, polytechnic institutes and private training establishments have designed courses to address clear market needs and provide future career opportunities for tomorrow's chefs, ICT professionals and engineers.

If you finished secondary, college or university studies in an academic insitution are not equivalent to that of New Zealand's, you may have to take further studeis in that country just to keep up with new trends or even gain a perspective on how your profession or trade is conducted there.  And of course you gain untold advantages just by studying: being able to build a business network; learning to speak English more fluently; gaining an insight into other cultures' belief systems and traditions.

You may want to listen to someone who's actually "walked the walk," so to speak. We're therefore sharing with you, a short video by Immigration New Zealand regarding New Zealand's Student to Resident Pathway >> 

SHORT COURSE ON LONG TERM PLANS

These four partners of the Immigrant Visa Center all have various programs in ICT, cookery, and hospitality.  One, Waiariki Bay of Plenty also offers programs for engineers.  If you don't find the program you're looking for, just give us a call and get INVITED to a FREE one-on-one consultation/orientation for school matching!  >>> CLICK HERE

IVC's International Partners in New Zealand

Do you believe you have what it takes to immigrate to New Zealand directly?  See for yourself if your occupation is listed in the Long Term Skills Shortage List.

Click here to check ==> New Zealand's Long Term Skills Shortage List

Immediate Skills Shortage List - (ISSL) includes occupations where skilled workers are immediately required in New Zealand and indicates that there are no New Zealand citizens or residents available to take up the position. While processing of application is faster (with a job offer) temporary work does not ensure eligibility for residency.  The link to the most current ISSL is shown below.

Click here to check ==> New Zealand's Immediate Skills Shortage List

Canterbury Skills Shortage List (CSSL) contains occupations in critical shortage in the Canterbury region following the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes. It draws on the occupations on the Immediate and Long Term Skill Shortage Lists (LTSSL) relevant to the Canterbury rebuild.


* "Auckland’s high immigration and skill shortage “disconnect” needs fixing?", AucklandChamber.co.nz, last modified August 9, 2016, http://www.aucklandchamber.co.nz/business-connect/news-advocacy/media-releases/auckland-s-high-immigration-and-skill-shortage-disconnect-needs-fixing/

** "Construction Jobs," NewZealandNow.govt.nz, last modified August 16, 2016, https://www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/work-in-nz/nz-jobs-industries/construction-jobs.

*** "Tourism Jobs," NewZealandNow.govt.nz, last modified July 29, 2016,   https://www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/work-in-nz/nz-jobs-industries/tourism-hospitality-jobs

**** "Information Technology," NewZealandNow.govt.nz, last modified July 29, 2016, https://www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/work-in-nz/nz-jobs-industries/information-technology-jobs

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About the Author

Crispin Aranda

Crispin Aranda

Crispin R. Aranda is an established International Visa Conselor and Immigrant Advocate. He is the president of IVC and is in several migration radio programs.


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