How Visa Dates Moved from 2004 to 2013

Time, like Lady Justice, is blind. Time moves on waiting for no one. You are either ready for tomorrow or simply let it be yesterday.

January is the first month under the Gregorian Calendar (previously known as the Julian Calendar) - the most widely accepted and used measurement of time in months and years.

October is the first month under the Fiscal Year of the U.S. Government and that observance signals the need to replenish the annual visa allocation.  Visas not used in the previous year are not recycled . If that were the case, if a certain category has a surplus (more visas than applicants) the remaining number would be added to the new year allocation. Then the waiting period of visa beneficiaries would not be measured in years and years.

But such is not the case.

While there are moves in the US Congress to reallocate unused visas, such a move remains a blur, a fleeting wisp of wish that vanishes into the realm of realpolitik.

As an update to our Kavisas, we are providing comparison of visa movement in January of 2004, 2009, 2013 and 2014 for the Family-sponsored and EB3 categories. You may then see how priority dates moved on a 5-year interval as well as how fast (or slow) visa dates moved within a year – based on figures for January 2013 and January 2014.

 

Categories

Jan. 2004

Jan. 2009

Jan. 2013

Jan. 2014

F1

12-22-89

7-15-93

12-22-91

7-01-01

F2A

1-01-99

5-15-04

9-22-10

9-08-13

F2B

5-08-95

9-01-97

4-15-02

5-01-03

F3

9-01-89

5-22-91

8-08-92

2-01-93

F4

12-22-81

5-01-86

4-15-89

7-01-90

EB3

Current

5-01-05

8-15-06

2-15-07

OW

Current

5-01-05

8-15-06

2-15-07

 

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