Writing Your Resumé For A Job Abroad

So now you’ve successfully passed your consular interview and will be leaving in a few months as an immigrant. Unless you are one of those with a pre-arranged employment offer or have a ready job waiting for you in your new country of residence, chances are you’ll be writing a resume before long.


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Writing Your Resumé For A Job Abroad
Posted on June 5, 2012

So now you’ve successfully passed your consular interview and will be leaving in a few months as an immigrant. Unless you are one of those with a pre-arranged employment offer or have a ready job waiting for you in your new country of residence, chances are you’ll be writing a resume before long.

There are literally thousands of books, entire websites and companies devoted solely to helping people write their own resumes. Google the phrase “tips on writing a resume” and you get so much information that may be impossible to go through and understand within a short amount of time.

To hire someone else to write you a credible, professional and effective resume is entirely your choice. But if you are resisting the temptation to have a friend or relative write it and want to do it yourself, go ahead and consider the following:

  • Your resume represents you. It is your most important marketing tool so the way it will eventually look will depend on how much time you spent writing it.
  • Always tell the truth. It just isn’t worth it to stretch the truth so far. If you get hired, you may not be able to carry out your duties very well.
  • Whether you wrote your resume a year ago, 6 months ago, you will have to dust it off and update it. Your resume is a document that tells a potential employer about you so it should reflect your latest achievements and skills. So plan, evaluate and above all, revise your resume whenever needed.
  • No matter what your field is, your resume is your best bet to get hired. You will have to position yourself in a way that the hiring manager/employer will believe that you are the best candidate, the perfect match for the position.
  • If you write your own resume, you get to decide what will be included. This means that you will have to review your qualifications and skills. This will translate to more confidence during an interview because you are more certain of your abilities.

So what exactly should you do?

  1. In other countries, hiring managers only have a short time to review your resume so your try to put everything on one page unless of course you have impressive credentials. Remember to put in only relevant and necessary information. Your list of reference can be printed out on a separate sheet of paper that you can share should the hiring manager ask for it. There is no need either to write “References available upon request” which may be considered rude by many.
  2. Have a short summary of your credentials and try using bullet points to summarize your achievements. You may want to use this heading to list down your other assets such as language and computer skills. Also use quantifiable accomplishments whenever possible.
  3. Ensure that your statements short, preferably not more than 2 sentences, using professional language at all times.
  4. State only your relevant education. While you were thrilled to win First Place in kindergarten or graduated first in your class from your elementary grade, these credentials will have no place in a professional resume.
  5. If you have been working for many years, list only the most current positions you have held.
  6. Always place information in reverse chronological order as hiring managers abroad will want to read your most current and relevant credentials. Also, if your educational background is more impressive, put that first. If your work experience is more significant, then put that section before your educational history.
  7. Customize your resume whenever you see fit to emphasize certain parts depending on the qualifications needed for the job you are applying for. And while you are customizing your resume, consider this: a hiring manager/potential employer will always think that your resume is about them and will judge your credentials accordingly. Do you have qualifications they may need? How (and when!) will you contribute to the overall productivity? How will you fit in with the rest of the employees?
  8. Keep the format simple and easy to understand because a hiring manager may not want to spend the extra time deciphering your resume’s unconventional format. And while you may want to show off your creativity, using MS word bullets and standard text formats like Times New Roman and Arial is better.
  9. And finally, use good quality ivory or white paper of heavier weight.

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