Work, Immigrant Visas to US and Canada this April and May, 2013

Do not put all your eggs in one basket.


For work and immigrant visa applicants, you must not limit your choices to one country.

After the Holy Week in the Philippines (Easter in the United States and Canada) 65,000 temporary work visas in the US come to life again as it does every 1st week of April.

On this recurring date, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announce the opening of the 65,000 quota for the H-1B visas (Specialty Occupations - where the temporary job being offered requires a bachelor’s degree or the job requires a combination of education and experience that would be considered the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree).

In the years past and until 2011, the annual cap was reached longer than before – almost 6 months from opening date. Last year, it took only about a month for the work visas to be filled up. This year, industry observers and even the USCIS itself say the 65,000 cap could be reached in four (4) days.

While Dentists and other health care professionals may qualify for the H-1B, Dental technicians, therapists, hygienists as well as medical technologists, sonographers, opticians, massage therapists and paramedical occupations are not.

Where would these technical occupations be able to find work visas or even permanent resident visas? Canada welcomes them.

There are 9 occupational groups: Business, finance and administrative occupations; Natural and applied sciences and related occupations; health occupations; Occupations in education, law, and social, community and government services; Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport; Sales and service occupations; Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations; Natural resources, agriculture and related production occupations and Occupations in manufacturing and utilities.

To qualify for permanent residency under Canada’s Federal Skilled Worker, an applicant’s occupation must be in an “O” (Managerial); “A” Professional or “B”Technical or Supervisory. Those categorized under “C” or “D” may be sponsored on work or temporary visas but not as permanent residents.

Technical occupations in health are classified under Major Group 22 in the 3rd Occupational Sectors under Canada’s National Occupational Classifications (NOC). The list includes:

Medical technologists and technicians (except dental health)
o 3211 Medical laboratory technologists
o 3212 Medical laboratory technicians and pathologists' assistants
o 3213 Animal health technologists and veterinary technicians
o 3214 Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists and cardiopulmonary technologists
o 3215 Medical radiation technologists
o 3216 Medical sonographers
o 3217 Cardiology technologists and electrophysiological diagnostic technologists, n.e.c.
o 3219 Other medical technologists and technicians (except dental health)

322 Technical occupations in dental health care
o 3221 Denturists
o 3222 Dental hygienists and dental therapists
o 3223 Dental technologists, technicians and laboratory assistants
323 Other technical occupations in health care
o 3231 Opticians
o 3232 Practitioners of natural healing
o 3233 Licensed practical nurses
o 3234 Paramedical occupations
o 3236 Massage therapists
o 3237 Other technical occupations in therapy and assessment

To have a free assessment on how you may qualify for permanent residency to Canada, log on to www.visacenter.org and complete the Personal Intake Sheet Online. Or call the Immigrant Visa Center at 02-634-8717.

Got a question? Let us know - we're here to help.

About the Author

Crispin Aranda

Crispin Aranda

Crispin R. Aranda is an established International Visa Conselor and Immigrant Advocate. He is the president of IVC and is in several migration radio programs.


IVC and IVC staff are proud members or affiliates of

ICCRC logoIBP logoICEF logoPIER logo
MARA logoCANCHAM logoANZCHAM logoBritish Council logo
a