Where Immigrants Settle in Canada

By Crispin R. Aranda, December 19, 2013

Which province in Canada offers the best opportunities? The answer is not a one-size fits all. Adveturers may choose British Columbia (Super. Naturally) while professionals and work-hunters go East to Ontario. The one migration route that cuts across provinces and classes is the Student to Resident program. Where do immigrants settle in Canada? Read on.

Where Immigrants Settle in Canada

Nationwide – or on the Federal level – Canada has been second to the United States in terms of immigrants admitted yearly.  There are three main areas or routes towards permanent residency: the Federal Skilled Workers Program (FSWP); the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP); and the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) as students or temporary workers.

Students may work 20 hours a week while school is in session and work full time during vacation. Then those completing certain courses become eligible for permanent residency either through the International Student Stream, FSW or PNP.

Through the years, Canada has fine-tuned its migration program, as the economy and the national mood swings.

Recently, provinces have been actively working to get their share of skilled workers, talents and businesspersons both by lobbying the Federal Government for increased share in migrant numbers and fine-tuning their own nomination programs.

In recent years, for example, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan have created the Entry Level and Semi-Skilled Worker sub-streams, focusing on specific industries and occupations in demand in select industry groups.

Not surprisingly, the Entry Level or Semi-Skilled categories center on the industries that each province has a competitive advantage of: British Columbia for Hospitality, Tourism; Alberta for industries and manufacturing.

Since 2003, Ontario has been the province with the highest number of immigrants. The flow has slowed and reduced to less than 100,000 in 2012. Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta and Manitoba have progressively increased their immigrant numbers (see table below).

Ontario’s attraction remains despite the slow-down.  By mid-September of this year, Ontario reached its 2013 allocation of nominees. “Applicants can still submit their applications under all streams. However, because the nominations target has been reached, Opportunities Ontario will no longer be able to issue any additional nominations for the remainder of 2013.

Nominee applications that cannot be finalized in 2013 will automatically be placed in priority for finalization in 2014. Complete nominee applications will be finalized on a first-come-first-serve basis.”

Province

2003

2007

2012

Alberta

15,839

20,860

36,092

British Columbia

35,229

38,961

36,241

Manitoba

6,503

10,954

13,312

New Brunswick

666

1,643

2,211

Newfoundland Labrador

359

546

731

Northwest Territories

94

127

166

Nova Scotia

1,474

2,523

2,341

Ontario

119,723

111,316

99,154

Prince Edward Island

154

992

1,088

Quebec

39,555

45,200

55,062

Saskatchewan

1,668

3,516

11,177

Yukon

59

83

273

 

To find out the best residency option for you (FSW, PNP or CEC) you may call the Immigrant Visa Center at (02) 634-8717 or send your resume to immigrants@visacenter.org

Crispin R. Aranda is an established immigration specialist. He is the president of IVC and is in several migration radio programs.