A photo of the United States of America

Overview

With more than 3 million Filipino Americans in the United States - and approximately 60,000 immigrant visas every year - the United States is the major destination for Filipinos seeking temporary (working, student, visitor, investor) and permanent visa options (Family-sponsored and Employment-based.)

Wages and Salaries

2016 Highlights:

  • New York became the second state to pass a new law that would raise the minimum wage in New York City to $15 per hour by the end of 2018. Washington D.C. followed suit, enacting a law to raise the minimum wage in the District to $15 per hour by July 1, 2020.
  • On April 4, California Governor Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 3 into law. The new law increases the minimum wage to $15 per hour by Jan. 1, 2022, for employers with 26 or more employees. For employers with 25 or fewer employees the minimum wage will reach $15 per hour by Jan. 1, 2023. Increases may be paused by the governor if certain economic or budgetary conditions exist. Beginning the first Jan. 1 after the minimum wage reaches $15 per hour for smaller employers, the minimum wage is indexed annually for inflation.
  • On March 2, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed SB 1532 into law. It establishes a series of annual minimum wage increases from July 1, 2016 through July 1, 2022. Beginning July 1, 2023, the minimum wage rate will be indexed to inflation based on the Consumer Price Index.
  • Fourteen states begin the new year with higher minimum wages. Of those, 12 states increased their rates through legislation passed in the 2014 or 2015 sessions, while two states automatically increased their rates based on the cost of living.
  • Of the 11 states that currently tie increases to the cost of living, eight did not increase their minimum wage rates for 2016. Colorado provided for an 8-cent increase and South Dakota granted a 5-cent increase per hour. Increases in Nevada are required to take effect in July.
  • Maryland, Minnesota and D.C. have additional increases scheduled for 2016. Nevada will announce in July whether or not there will be a cost of living increase to their indexed minimum wage.
State Minimum Wage As of Jan. 1, 2016 Future Enacted Indexed Automatic
    Increases Annual Adjustments
 Alabama none    
 Alaska $9.75   Indexed annual increases begin Jan. 1, 2017. (2014 ballot measure)
 Arizona $8.05   Rate increased annually based on cost of living. (Ballot measure 2006)
 Arkansas $8.00 $8.50 eff. 1-1-17  
 California $10.00 $15.00 eff. 1-1-2022  
 Colorado $8.31   Rate increased or decreased annually based on cost of living. (Constitutional amendment 2006)
 Connecticut $9.60 $10.10 eff. 1-1-17 The Connecticut minimum wage rate automatically increases to 1/2 of 1 percent above the rate set in the Fair Labor Standards Act if the Federal minimum wage rate equals or becomes higher than the State minimum.
 Delaware $8.25    
 D.C. $10.50 $11.50 eff. 7-1-16; $12.50 eff. 7-1-17; $13.25 eff. 7-1-18; $14.00 eff. 7-1-19; $15.00 eff. 7-1-20  
 Florida $8.05   Annual increase based cost of living. (Constitutional amendment 2004)
 Georgia $5.15    
 Guam $8.25    
 Hawaii $8.50 $9.25 eff. 1-1-17; $10.10 eff. 1-1-18  
 Idaho $7.25    
 Illinois $8.25    
 Indiana $7.25    
 Iowa $7.25    
 Kansas $7.25    
 Kentucky $7.25    
 Louisiana none    
 Maine $7.50   The Maine minimum wage is automatically replaced with the Federal minimum wage rate if it is higher than the State minimum with the exception that any such increase is limited to no more than $1.00 per hour above the current legislated State rate.
 Maryland $8.25 $8.75 eff. 7-1-16  
    $9.25 eff. 7-1-17  
    $10.10 eff. 7-1-18  
 Massachusetts $10.00 $11.00 eff. 1-1-17 The Massachusetts minimum wage rate automatically increases to 10 cents above the rate set in the Fair Labor Standards Act if the Federal minimum wage equals or becomes higher than the State minimum.
 Michigan $8.50 $8.90 eff. 1-1-17 Annual increases take effect Jan. 1, 2019, linked to the CPI. Increases not to exceed 3.5%. (2014 Legislation)
    $9.25 eff. 1-1-18  
 Minnesota $9.00/$7.25 Large Employers: $9.50 eff. 8-1-16.  Small Employers: $7.75 eff. 8-1-16 Indexed annual increases begin Jan. 1, 2018. (2014 legislation)
 Mississippi none    
 Missouri $7.65   Minimum wage increased or decreased by cost of living starting Jan. 1, 2008. (2006 ballot measure)
 Montana $8.05/$4.00   Increases done annually based on the CPI and effective Jan. 1 of the following year. (2006 ballot measure)
 Nebraska $9.00    
 Nevada $8.25/$7.25   Increases subject to the federal minimum wage and consumer price index. Increases take effect July 1. (Constitutional amendment 2004/2006).  $8.25 without health benefits; $7.25 with health benefits.
 New Hampshire repealed by HB 133 (2011)    
 New Jersey $8.38   Indexed annual increases based on the CPI, effective Jan. 1, 2014. (Constitutional Amendment 2013)
 New Mexico $7.50    
 New York $9.00 $15.00 eff. 12-31-2018  
 North Carolina $7.25    
 North Dakota $7.25    
 Ohio $8.10/$7.25   Indexed annual increases based on the CPI. (Constitutional amendment 2006).  $7:25 for employers grossing $283,000 or less
 Oklahoma $7.25/$2.00   Employers of ten or more full time employees at any one location and employers with annual gross sales over $100,000 irrespective of number of full time employees are subject to federal minimum wage; all others are subject to state minimum wage of $2.00 (OK ST T. 40 § 197.5).
 Oregon $9.25 $9.75 eff. 7-1-2016; $10.25 eff. 7-1-2017; $10.75 eff. 7-1-2018; $11.25 eff. 7-1-2019; $12.00 eff. 7-1-2020; $12.75 eff. 7-1-2021; $13.50 eff. 7-1-2022 Indexed annual increases based on the CPI are effective July 1, 2023 (2016 legislation).  In addition to the new standard minimum wage rate, SB 1532 sets out a higher rate for employers located in the urban growth boundary, and a lower rate for employers located in nonurban counties. 
 Pennsylvania $7.25    
 Rhode Island $9.60    
 South Carolina none    
 South Dakota $8.55   Annual indexed increases begin Jan. 1, 2016. (2014 ballot measure.)
 Tennessee none    
 Texas $7.25    
 Utah $7.25    
 Vermont $9.60 $10.00 eff. 1-1-17; $10.50 eff. 1-1-18 Beginning Jan. 1, 2019, minimum wage increased annually by 5% or the CPI, whichever is smaller; it cannot decrease. Note: Vermont started indexing in 2007 but enacted additional increases in 2014. (2014 legislation)
 Virginia $7.25    
 Washington $9.47   Annual indexed increases began Jan. 1, 2001. (ballot measure 1998)
 West Virginia $8.75    
 Wisconsin $7.25    
 Wyoming $5.15    

Other Exceptions

  • Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas, Puerto Rico, Utah, and Virginiaexclude from coverage any employment that is subject to the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.
  • Hawaii, Kansas, and Michigan exclude from coverage any employment that is subject to the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act, if the State wage is higher than the Federal wage.
  • The Georgia state minimum wage is $5.15. Employees covered under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act are subject to the federal minimum wage of $7.25, but those not covered under the FLSA may be paid the state minimum wage of $5.15.

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures.  http://www.ncsl.org/research/labor-and-employment/state-minimum-wage-chart.aspx.  Last Visited July 10, 2016

Cost of Living

Expense * Ann Arbor New York City Los Angeles San Francisco
Apartment, 1BR in City Centre 1,000 - 1,500 2,100 - 3,500 1,500 - 2,200 3,000 - 3,763.33
Apartment, 1BR outside of City Centre 800 - 900 1,350 - 2,500 1,100 - 1,600 2,000 - 3,000
Basic utilities e.g. electricity, heating, water, garbage for an 85 sq.m. apartment 120 - 228.73 85 - 200 80 - 196.15 62 - 165
Internet, 10Mbps, Unlimited Data, Cable/ADSL 29.99 - 65 40 - 70 35 - 65 40 - 75
Transportation, Monthly Pass not unlimited 58 116 - 120 60 - 100 70 - 83
Gasoline, 1 liter 0.53 - 0.66 0.56 - 0.81 0.74 - 0.97 0.74 - 0.95
Regular Milk, 1 liter 0.71 - 0.79 0.86 - 1.32 0.75 - 1.19 0.79 - 1.85
White Rice, 1 kg. 2.20 - 2.28 4.39 - 7.12 2.20 - 6.61 2.20 - 7.91
Loaf of Fresh White Bread, 500g 1.65 - 2.76 2.20 - 4.41 2.20 - 3.86 3.31 - 4.68
Eggs, 1 dozen 2 - 3 2.59 - 4.50 2.99 - 4.69 3 - 5
Chicken breasts, boneless and skinless, 1 kg 6.61 - 11.02 8.82 - 17.61 6.39 - 15.41 8.80 - 17.64
Beef round, 1kg, 11 - 11.02 9.90 - 24.25 8.80 - 16.53 12.68 - 19.82
Potato, 1 kg. 0.99 - 2.20 2.20 - 4.41 1.96 - 4.41 1.76 - 6.61
Tomato, 1 kg. 2.18 - 4.41 3.28 - 8.82 2.20 - 6.59 4.39 - 8.80
Banana, 1kg. 1.21 - 1.42 1.52 - 2.65 1.54 - 3.31 1.74 - 4.39
Water, 1.5 liter bottle 1 - 1.79 1 - 2.70 1 - 2.50 2 - 3
Domestic Beer, .5 liter bottle 2 - 3.50 1.50 - 3 1.50 - 3 1 - 3
Meal, inexpensive restaurant 10 - 17 12 - 25 11 - 20 12 - 20
McMeal at McDonalds (or equivalent Combo Meal) 6 - 8 7 - 10 6 - 8 6 - 9
Cappuccino, regular 3 - 4 3.75 - 5 3.50 - 5 3.50 - 4.95
Cinema, International Release 10 - 12 13 - 16 12 - 15 12 - 15
Pair of Levi jeans or similar 40 - 50 40 - 70 35 - 65 40 - 75
1 Summer Dress in a Chain Store e.g. Zara, H&M 24.99 - 50 25 - 60 25 - 50 25 -50
Volkswagen Golf 1.4 90 KW Trendline (Or Equivalent New Car) 18,500 - 21,000 20,000 - 25,000 19,000 - 25,000 21,000 - 26,000

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